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Hazards Working Over 11 Hours a day

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In an active community environment, there is a group of people who are willing to spend 11 hours of his time in the day to work. Even more than 11 hours per day. But, you know, it just does not make healthy habits and lead to various diseases?

According to one study, spent more than 11 hours in the workplace can increase the risk of heart attack. The risk as much as two-thirds higher than those working less than 11 hours a day.

The team of researchers from University College London studied more than 7000 civil servants working in Whitehall for 11 years and how many hours it takes them to work every day.

Researchers said the risk was so great that physicians should ask how many hours they worked and how much they drink alcohol or smoke. They also collect information regarding the condition of their liver or liver from medical records and health checks. During that period, a total of 192 respondents suffered a heart attack.

The study, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that employees who work more than 11 hours a 67% risk of developing heart than those who work from 9 am to five pm.

The researchers said their findings have the potential to prevent thousands of people from heart attacks during the year and can help doctors determine the cause of patients stricken with the heart. For example, heart attacks in patients already at high risk for obesity and smoking, can be prevented by reducing their working hours.

"We have demonstrated, long working days can be associated with remarkable increase in the risk of heart disease," said study leader Professor Mika Kivimäki, cited by page Daily Mail.

This new information can help decision-treatment solutions for heart disease. Also, it can be used to sensitize the people who are too busy working, especially for those who have other factors pushing heart attack.

Heart disease usually occurs because of blockage of blood vessels by fat. This risk increases if the person smokes, has high blood pressure and cholesterol.

"Whitehall study really helped us shape the understanding related to the social determinants of heart disease," said Professor Peter Weissberg, medical director at the British Heart Foundation.

But according to him, these new findings require further research to explain how this can affect heart health in order to change the approach of doctors to assess one's risk of heart attacks and solutions that they can provide the working conditions of the patient.
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